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Dustin Putman

Dustin's Review

Capsule Review
Friday the 13th Part 2  (1981)
2 Stars
Directed by Steve Miner.
Cast: Amy Steel, John Furey, Stu Charno, Marta Kober, Tom McBride, Lauren-Marie Taylor, Tom McBride, Kirsten Baker, Bill Randolph, Russell Todd, Adrienne King, Warrington Gillette.
1981 – 87 minutes
Rated: Rated R (for violence, sexual content, nudity, and language).
Reviewed by Dustin Putman, October 2008.

Crazy Ralph:
I told the others, they didn't believe me. You're all doomed. You're all doomed...

Sped into production after its predecessor hit the jackpot at the box-office, "Friday the 13th Part 2" is more of the same, but with a twist: the killer hacking his way through a bevy of camp-counselors-in-training is the thought-dead Jason Voorhees himself. There's no hockey mask in sight just yet, but he does wear an imposing sack over his head that is actually a whole lot more effectively disconcerting. Taking over for lead protagonist Adrienne King (who shows up in an opening scene cameo to give new meaning to the term "headache") is the endlessly fetching and always likable Amy Steel (later seen in 1986's "April Fool's Day"), the best "Final Girl" the series ever saw. At the time, "Friday the 13th Part 2" fell victim to the MPAA rating system and, watching the film today, the choppy cuts of violence show through. Nevertheless, this is a solid first sequel—the elongated climactic chase set-piece still ranks as one of the more memorable in any horror feature, to date—and the truly chilling jump scare at the end gives the original's a run for its money.





© 2008 by Dustin Putman
Dustin Putman